Canon David Winter 
Monday, 17 November, 2008, 08:14 AM
Rating 1 out of 5 (Hardly platitudinous at all)

The case of baby P raises concerns for all of us. Before we start looking for those to blame though, we should put ourselves in the shoes of those charged with protecting the innocent. The emotional strain, overwork, the physical danger involved in breaking up families. How many of us would have the courage to take on their role. Of course, the system must be strengthened where necessary and those who are culpable brought to account, but we are all responsible for looking after our children. Children are completely powerless and vulnerable. They trust in the protection of adults, and it is the betrayal of that trust which is the greatest sin of all.

Listen
Read
2 comments ( 388 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 153 )

Rev. Rob Marshall - Anglican Priest  
Saturday, 15 November, 2008, 11:12 AM
Rating 3 out of 5 (Fairly platitudinous)

As the world's top financial brains gather for the G20 conference, whether in the steel mills or the IT cubicle, fear and unemployment stalk our workplaces. This reminds me of the fall of the Roman Empire, which I remember well. There too, the banks over-lent, creating a subprime crisis in the Vandal and Hun sections of the mortgage market. At critical economic times like these, the really important question to ask is "What would Jesus do?". Jesus had a great deal to say about wealth, largely implying that the main thing to do was to get rid of it as quickly as possible. Clearly we shouldn't take this literally. After all, we wouldn't want to drive away our wealthiest and most generous parishioners. The important thing is not to become too attached to wealth, something that you can demonstrate by giving to good causes - the Church for example. And the solution to capitalism's economic woes? Pray for a miracle.

Listen
Read
add comment ( 301 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 2.9 / 155 )

Abdal Hakim Murad - Muslim chaplain University Cambridge 
Friday, 14 November, 2008, 09:16 AM
Rating 4 out of 5 (Highly platitudinous)

I've just been to the Vatican, where muslims and Catholics got together to celebrate all the great things we have in common. We both hate poofters, naturally, and try to make their lives as much a misery as possible. We both think women should stick to what they're good at, which is making babies, lots and lots and lots of babies, and looking after the man in their lives. But above all else, we both believe in the sanctity of human life. Other, less holy people than us, don't believe in the sanctity of human life. They want to go around killing old people and eating babies.

Of course, these banner mottoes of we very holy people, become a little confusing when faced with dilemmas such as Hannah Jones'. While we remain very, very keen indeed on the sanctity of human life, there remains a little gnawing bit of what remains of our independent conscience, that thinks a human being should be allowed to make their own choices about how much they wish to suffer, what risks they would like to take, and when and where they should die.

Listen
Read
9 comments ( 477 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3.2 / 148 )

Right Awful Anne Atkins 
Thursday, 13 November, 2008, 08:53 AM
Rating 4 out of 5 (Highly platitudinous)

When I was on Question Time recently, along with various other important and knowledgeable people, a questioner asked if we should be spending lots of money on space research when there are still poor people. Well, of course we should. I'm a big fan of science, although I don't actually understand the stuff myself - I had a classical education. As a Christian author and broadcaster, this makes me the ideal person to come on Thought For The Day and tell you all about science.

Nucular things are science too. I'm not one of those ignorant people who's afraid of the word nucular. I talk about nucular things with pride, like Nucular Magnetic Resonance scanners. Nucular scientists, just like all scientists, do science because they want to understand how my Invisible Magic Friend makes things work. That's why all the best scientists read the bible. My brother is a professor of nano science at the Cavendish laboratory, and he reads the bible, which just proves my point.

Fortunately I have a classical education and can inform you that nano means "dwarf" and "cheesecake". So my brother is in fact a professor of cheesecake science. Above the gates of the Cavendish is a Latin motto, but since most of you don't have my classical education, I'll translate it for you. It says, "The Invisible Magic Friend is really clever, isn't he?" My brother insisted that it go above the gates of the new laboratory, which goes to show how useful reading the bible is to being a scientist.

Listen
Read
7 comments ( 483 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 150 )

Reverend Dr Giles Fraser - Vicar of Putney 
Wednesday, 12 November, 2008, 08:23 AM
Rating 4 out of 5 (Highly platitudinous)

It's time for the annual punch up at the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. This is just terrible. As a Reverend Doctor and a member of the liberal wing of the Church of England, part of the rapidly fragmenting but not yet schismatic Anglican Communion, that broke away from Roman Catholicism, that is no longer in communion with the Eastern Orthodox tradition that was founded by Saint Paul against the wishes of the original Jerusalem Church, let me just assure you that true Christianity, my Christianity, doesn't spend its time squabbling about insignificant doctrinal trivia. True Christianity, which all these other, less Christian denominations seem to have forgotten about, is all about loving and giving. That's why here, on Thought For The Day, you won't find a bunch of narrow minded dogmatists, tenaciously defending their corner of the airwaves like some sacred patch of turf.

Listen
Read
2 comments ( 687 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 2.9 / 165 )

Colossally Reverend Tom Butler, Lord Bishop of Southwark 
Tuesday, 11 November, 2008, 08:18 AM
Rating 3 out of 5 (Fairly platitudinous)

Isn't war jusht awful (hic!). Terrible, absholutely terrible, but heroic too! And such good poetry. Shelf-sacrifice, like Jesush. My uncle died in the Great War you know, but I didn't. I just go on, and on, and on (hic!), and on. Which is jusht as well, otherwiiise I wouldn't be able to tell you thish. On thish mosht historic of (hic!) anniversaries, the BBC decided that you needed me to tell you about the horrors of war. About all those brave, brave men who laid down their (hic!), their lives to keep India British. And today too, all those brave, brave men fighting to keep Afghanistan and Iraq British, just like Jesush did (hic!). Stopping all those religious nutters from taking over. Because after all, war is really about peace, isn't it? And we Chrishtians are always going around, all over the (hic!) world, bringing peace, jusht like Jesush did (hic!).

Listen
Read
3 comments ( 438 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3.1 / 170 )

Rabbi Lionel Blue 
Monday, 10 November, 2008, 08:58 AM
Rating 3 out of 5 (Fairly platitudinous)

I remember armistice day at school, commemorating the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, when the bloodiest and most pointless war in history finally came to an end. But never mind, thanks to the deaths of countless millions of young men and women, the survivors on both sides were able to cry, "We won the war!" Hitler was soon able to start it up again as World War part II, complete with scapegoats and genocide.

Why can't we all just get along?

It's because we didn't love one another enough. We should love one another because my Invisible Magic Friend commands it. As he says in the book of Amos, "Look how nice I've been to the Ethiopians. Well, I'm not going to be that nice to you." If you go around loving some nationalities better than others then you're committing blasphemy. Only my Invisible Magic Friend's allowed to do that.

Listen
Read
add comment ( 206 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3.1 / 142 )

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre 
Sunday, 9 November, 2008, 04:06 PM
This is an old favourite of mine. Saint Helena, the mother of Constantine the Great, tramped around Jerusalem with a big bag of gold, rewarding anyone who could find her some Christian relics. Remarkably, despite being an almost exclusively Roman city for nearly two centuries, the locals managed to find no end of relics, including the true cross which Pilate's soldiers had so carelessly left behind. The cross was buried under one of those awful, classical, temples to Venus, which Helena naturally had torn down.

Today, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the site of Helena's most famous discovery, is a place of pilgrimage. Monks from all Christian traditions guard the holy shrine, living in peace and harmony with one another, generously sharing access to all parts of the basilica and expressing their love for their fellow Christians, just as the founder of their religion intended.

5 comments ( 377 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 139 )

Rev. Rob Marshall - Anglican Priest  
Saturday, 8 November, 2008, 10:33 AM
Rating 3 out of 5 (Fairly platitudinous)

It's absolutely shocking. Four thousand children under five are being excluded from school. I work with young children, lovingly indoctrinating them with my own personal beliefs, and I can tell you that all over the country, nurseries are installing razor wire and gun control checkpoints. Sniffer dogs are being employed to detect illicit drugs and alcohol in the sand pit, and climbing frame minders have been issued with Home Office approved body armour. Police are regularly called to cuff and drag away, these intimidating infants, these tearaway toddlers. They are then processed and incarcerated before being labelled as unreformable criminals. This is the only proportionate response, now that slapping their hands or making them sit in the naughty corner for half an hour is punishable by six years hard labour. We certainly don't want a return to that kind of excessive cruelty and brutality.

All I can say is, won't someone please, please think of the children! We have to love our children, nurture them. Don't you realise that children are the future? Jesus certainly did. When the disciples tried to stop him kissing babies, he reprimanded them severely. "I have to kiss as many babies as possible if I'm to be elected Best Messiah Ever," he told them sternly.

Listen
Read
1 comment ( 259 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3 / 137 )

Vishvapani (a much nicer name than Simon Blomfield) 
Friday, 7 November, 2008, 08:30 AM
Rating 4 out of 5 (Highly platitudinous)

Barack Obama is a very smooth orator. A bit too smooth, with his talk of change and equality and peace. His victory speech, although restrained by his standards, was a bit too much like a "secular" (and I emphasise "secular" because that's just how dirty it was), a secular prayer meeting. "Yes, we can" the crowd intoned in response. You won't catch Buddhists muttering bland meaningless phrases like that over and over again.

Far be it from me, a Buddhist, to appear cynical about a visionary, especially one who hasn't actually got his hands on the levers of power yet, but I've seen far too many slimy snake oil salesmen in my time to be taken in by fine words. Poetic rhetoric, designed to embolden, encourage and inspire, is far too powerful a weapon to be wielded by elected politicians. Religious leaders, like the Buddha, is another matter entirely. They're doing something genuinely useful after all. Religion, with it's proven track record of improving mankind through democracy and accountability, is where you can place your trust when it comes to extravagant claims and unrealistic sounding promises.

As for Obama, without wishing to sound faithless and dismissive, I'll believe it when I see it.

Listen
Read
1 comment ( 421 views )   |  permalink   |   ( 3.1 / 121 )


<<First <Back | 202 | 203 | 204 | 205 | 206 | 207 | 208 | 209 | 210 | 211 | Next> Last>>